Toberatsagairt, Tobar a' tSagairt, The Priests' Well, Soheen

Site of Toberatsagairt Holy Well
James Feeney

Townland: Soheen, Kilnamona

Description of Holy Well and Landscape Setting

In map records, the well is indicated as being in the corner of a large grazing field near the Cappanakilla Road as it turns off to Soheen Town. The field appears to have been improved or upgraded in recent years in the general area of the well. At the time of the research visit no trace of the well could be found.  A large area of foliage deeper in the field was also checked without success.

Saint and Feast Day Associated with Holy Well

The name Toberatsagairt, The Priests’ Well, does not seem to be in reference to any one specific priest. There may have been something in local folklore to explain the name of the well but no reference to this has been found to date. Unfortunately both the physical well and its related practices seem to have disappeared.

Heritage Attractions Nearby

The site of the well is a ten minute drive from Dysert O’Dea Church and Tower House.

Additional Information

There are other Holy Wells near the site of Toberatsagairt Holy Well, including Tobar Oidhreachta beside Dysert O’Dea church and Tober Tola(gh) in the field beside the abbey. In the rise to the south is Toberbran and down the Soheen road towards Magowna is Tobar na mBan Alainn.

Discover More…

Clare County Library

Record of Monuments and Places Number

RMP-CL025-101

Comments about this page

  • The name ‘Tobar Oidhreacta’ commonly applied to the ‘well’ beside Dysert church is, I suggest, a corruption of the term ‘tobar rabhartach’ i.e. a bounteous or overflowing well which, indeed, is quite an apt description. The word rabhartach is sometimes applied to a tidal wave or heavy sea. Lá rabhartach is a term for the day of a spring-tide. In reality, the Dysert well is NOT a well in the normal sense; it is not a spring but a rich and gushing underground stream which is impeded or partially blocked at that point to divert the water upwards to form a ‘well’ .

    By Michael Mac Mahon (10/02/2022)

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