Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Toberpatrick, Tobar Phadráig, Rossalia

Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney
Saint Patrick's Holy Well, Abbey, Rossalia
James Feeney

Townland: Abbey, Rossalia,

The townland name comes from Ros Sáile, ‘The Wood of the Salt Water’.

Description of Holy Well and Landscape Setting

This well lies close to the mountain track on the north-east side of Abbey Hill above the R67 road, with views to the south end of Galway Bay. The well is very simple and situated in a confined space. It may not have lent itself to crowded assemblies. There is a small ivory-coloured statue indicating the well site and what looks to be rag tree nearby, created in recent years. The well lies beside a public track which follows the contour of the hill.

Saint and Feast Day Associated with Holy Well

This holy well is dedicated to Patrick, Patron Saint of Ireland. His feast day is 17th March.

Natural Heritage around the Holy Well

There is heather, ferns and some weather-beaten trees in the area near the holy well.

Heritage Attractions Nearby

Kinvarra and Ballyvaughan Villages are close by. They offer food, refreshments and accommodation.

Additional Information

Thomas L. Cooke, ‘Autumnal Rambles about New Quay, County Clare’,  1842-43:

When the visitor of Patrick’s Well looks towards the east, his eye is met by nought save bare-looking limestone spread over the face of the country, until vision grows faint in the distance. Yet, such appearance of barrenness is deceitful, for there are not only rich sheep-walks to be found among the rocks, but this richness has been generated and continues to be supported by the disintegration of the limestone, which seems to the unskilful to be so unproductive. A solitary exception to this cheerless sameness of landscape presents itself in a ragged white-thorn bush, growing on the side of the mountain a little above the well, and which wears the appearance of having long encountered the withering winter’s blast.

Discover More…

Clare County Library

Clare County Library

Cooke, T.L 1842, ‘Autumnal Rambles about New Quay, County Clare’ in Galway Vindicator Newspaper. Available at Clare County Library Available to view on Clare County Library Website

 

Record of Monuments and Places Number

RMP-CL003-02101

Surveyed by Michael Houlihan

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